Mathematical Collaboration III

April 29th & 30th 2019

Wills Memorial Building, Bristol

Map of key locations

Registration is free, and completed via this online form: https://goo.gl/forms/enByHCUmHeXX2QZi1

Organised by Josh Habgood-Coote, Aadil Kurji and Fenner Tanswell

Supported by the EPSRC grant “The Social Machines of Mathematics” led by Prof. Ursula Martin.

After the previous two successful workshops on group knowledge and mathematical collaboration (Oxford 2017) and social virtues in mathematics (St Andrews 2018), this year we return with a focus on communities and communication in mathematics.

Mathematical progress is a collective endeavour. Researchers build on one another’s work, collaborate, and rely on one another to learn techniques, and to identify interesting problems. Well-designed communities can support inquiry, foster collaboration, and include diverse researchers. Badly-designed communities can stymie inquiry, block collaboration, and can exclude people from marginalised groups. To understand what well-functioning communities look like, we need to address a couple of questions:

  • How do members of the mathematical community rely on one another? What kinds of content can be communicated? (results, practices, techniques, software)
  • What kinds of institutional structures support these kinds of reliance? How can online platforms, or different kinds of relationship support progress? What kinds of publication practices contribute to these goals?
  • What kinds of patterns of inclusion are fostered in these communities? What kinds of bodies are on the inside? How might mathematical education and citation practices address these issues?

These questions lay the ground for the important normative question: how might institutional structures in mathematics be designed to best support intellectual progress? To address these questions properly, we need to engage in interdisciplinary inquiry, bringing together mathematical practice, social epistemology, sociology, education, and computer science. We also need to include working mathematicians, and researchers who are working on practical projects to improve the profession.

 

Sunday 28th April

Pre-workshop informal gathering for those already in Bristol. Fenner arrives in Bristol at 13:30, and after checking in at he hotel is free to socialise, as is Aadil from mid-afternoon. We have booked a table on the Grain Barge between 4pm and 8pm for dinner and drinks. We hope to see many of you there:

https://www.bristolbeerfactory.co.uk/grain-barge

Monday 29th April, Wills Memorial Building room 3.33

9 -9.30 Coffee+Welcome

9.30-10.30 Fenner Tanswell & Josh Habgood-Coote “Group Knowledge and Mathematical Collaboration”

10.30-10.50 Coffee

10.50-11.50 Philip Welch “In Cahoots: The Cabal Seminar 1976 – 1981 – a case study”

11.50-12.00 Break

12-1 Adam Dunn “The Secret Life of Statistics: How the evolution of eighteenth-century statistical thought depended on networks, communities and collaborations”

1-2 Lunch + coffee

2-3 Jacob Ward “Communicating a Theory of Mathematical Communication”

3-3.30 Coffee

3.30-4.30 Stephen Crowley “What does the mathematical community do? Some initial speculations”

4.30-5 Coffee & Informal Discussion

5.00-7.30 Downtime/Pub

7.30 Conference dinner at Krishna’s Inn

 

Tuesday 30th April, Wills Memorial Building room 1.5

9 -9.30 Coffee+Welcome

9.30-10.30 Line Edslev Andersen “The High Bar for Relying on Testimony in Mathematics”

10.30-10.50 Coffee

10.50-11.50 Catarina Dutilh Novaes “Adversarial collaboration and transferability in mathematical proofs”

11.50-12.00 Break

12-1 Brendan Larvor “The Gatekeepers’ Last Sigh: reflections on the Jaffe-Quinn episode in the age of arXiv”

1-2 Lunch + coffee

2-3 Haixin Dang “Peer Review and the Social Structure of Mathematics”

3-3.30 Coffee

3.30-4.30 Elizabeth de Freitas “Bruno Latour’s Gaia: The mathematical aesthetic and dis/trust in science”

4.30-5 Coffee

5-6 James Ladyman TBC

Informal dinner, organised on the night.

Confirmed speakers include:

Philip Welch (University of Bristol) “In Cahoots: The Cabal Seminar 1976 – 1981 – a case study”

Jacob Ward (University of Oxford) “Communicating a Theory of Mathematical Communication”

Ursula Martin (University of Oxford) “Journeys in mathematical landscapes: genius or craft?”

Brendan Larvor (University of Hertfordshire) “The Gatekeepers’ Last Sigh: reflections on the Jaffe-Quinn episode in the age of arXiv”

James Ladyman (University of Bristol)

Catarina Dutilh Novaes (Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam) “Adversarial collaboration and transferability in mathematical proofs”

Adam Dunn  (University of St Andrews) “The Secret Life of Statistics: How the evolution of eighteenth-century statistical thought depended on networks, communities and collaborations”

Elizabeth de Freitas (Manchester Metropolitan University) “Bruno Latour’s Gaia: The mathematical aesthetic and dis/trust in science”

Haixin Dang (University of Pittsburgh) “Peer Review and the Social Structure of Mathematics”

Stephen Crowley (Boise State University) “Is mathematical knowledge common knowledge?”

Line Edslev Andersen (Aarhus Universitet) “The high bar for relying on testimony in mathematics”

Accessibility

Accessibility information for the venue can be found here:

Wills Memorial Accessibility

Wills Memorial Building Information

Contact us at

F.Tanswell {at} lboro.ac.uk

josh.habgood-coote {at} bristol.ac.uk

ak12004 {at} bristol.ac.uk